>

Great Job, 'Birdman,' But 'The X-Files' Did It First | Indiewire

You might say that this article is the very definition of my wheelhouse.

slackmistress:

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.
She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.
She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.
After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

This is also what a hero looks like.

slackmistress:

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

This is also what a hero looks like.

megsokay:


Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell.

THIS IS SO GREAT.

INTO IT.

megsokay:

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell.

THIS IS SO GREAT.

INTO IT.

(Source: dolorousxqueen)

dadofthedecade:

denali-winter:

amydentata:

patrickklepek:

emilywk:

stfueverything:

dbvictoria:

With all the heat Anita Sarkeesian gets for her Tropes series, you’d think it was a new topic, but Gene Siskel & Roger Ebert had a discussion on a similar theme when they were talking about the influx of slasher movies on their show in 1980.

(x)

34 years later and this is STILL relevant

This happened before I was born. And yes, still relevant. 

It’s crazy to think this conversation happened in 1980.

All these SJW warriors, I tell ya, ruining game—I mean film, or whatever. Oh it’s two dudes? Weird. Shit man, SJW warriors gettin desperate, going back in time and inventing women problems to justify their shit now. The conspiracy goes all the way to the top, AND BACK IN TIME

1980!

Man. Don’t let the Gamergate people see this. Their brains will explode between not liking the message but not knowing how to threaten men.

(via slackmistress)

I am always behind when it comes to getting into the hottest jams, but this is good music for your earholes.

(Source: Spotify)

>

a collection of links for locking down your shit

tiffanyb:

I don’t do anything especially high profile, but after now WEEKS, MONTHS, YEARS of watching women get bullied offline for like, having opinions in public, I’m starting to lock my online life down a little bit. Some links:

Addendum to previous post.

Fuck GamerGate for making me nervous to write about GamerGate.

Fuck being nervous to write about GamerGate.

Fuck threats against women not being taken seriously.

Fuck driving great talent out of the industry.

Fuck creating lynch mobs.

Fuck Intel.

Fuck GamerGate.

Fuck GamerGate for making me nervous to write about GamerGate.

kenyatta:

Eliza is the grandmother of every customer service online help box with a robot on the other end, and, now, the perfect foil for the robotic repetition of GamerGate talking points by its activist army, finding those using the #GamerGate hashtag and asking for them for more information.
More than a day later, this is still going on - wasting their time, and giving those who have had to constantly defend themselves some breathing space. It’s wonderful.
Eliza (named for the character from Pygmalion) is an example of a Twitter bot, a very primitive form of artificial intelligence plugged into a social network, and programmed to do certain things. Mostly, these bots are run by spammers - they’ll constantly be searching for tweets that mention certain words or phrases, or which use certain hashtags, and then they’ll tweet a reply out of nowhere with a link and something to tempt a user to click it.

While most bots are relatively easy to code and rely on little more than search-and-respond for instructions, Eliza’s a bit more complex. It (or she?) was first written by MIT computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum in 1964, and it deliberately models psychotherapy sessions - Eliza will ask the user what’s wrong, and will interpret and respond to what they say by comparing answers to a set of scripts in a database. 
Alan Turing proposed that an artificial intelligence qualified as a capable of thought if a human subject, in conversation with it and another human, cannot tell them apart; the strange thing about the Eliza Twitter bot is it doesn’t come across as any more like a machine than those who keep repeating their points over and over and over, ad nauseum. It’s difficult to decide who’s failed the Turing test here.
(via New Statesman | The ultimate weapon against GamerGate time-wasters: a 1960s chat bot that wastes their time)
h/t xuhulk

kenyatta:

Eliza is the grandmother of every customer service online help box with a robot on the other end, and, now, the perfect foil for the robotic repetition of GamerGate talking points by its activist army, finding those using the #GamerGate hashtag and asking for them for more information.

More than a day later, this is still going on - wasting their time, and giving those who have had to constantly defend themselves some breathing space. It’s wonderful.

Eliza (named for the character from Pygmalion) is an example of a Twitter bot, a very primitive form of artificial intelligence plugged into a social network, and programmed to do certain things. Mostly, these bots are run by spammers - they’ll constantly be searching for tweets that mention certain words or phrases, or which use certain hashtags, and then they’ll tweet a reply out of nowhere with a link and something to tempt a user to click it.

While most bots are relatively easy to code and rely on little more than search-and-respond for instructions, Eliza’s a bit more complex. It (or she?) was first written by MIT computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum in 1964, and it deliberately models psychotherapy sessions - Eliza will ask the user what’s wrong, and will interpret and respond to what they say by comparing answers to a set of scripts in a database. 

Alan Turing proposed that an artificial intelligence qualified as a capable of thought if a human subject, in conversation with it and another human, cannot tell them apart; the strange thing about the Eliza Twitter bot is it doesn’t come across as any more like a machine than those who keep repeating their points over and over and over, ad nauseum. It’s difficult to decide who’s failed the Turing test here.

(via New Statesman | The ultimate weapon against GamerGate time-wasters: a 1960s chat bot that wastes their time)

h/t xuhulk

flavorcountry:

gatsbyadventures:

Who you gonna call?

Corgbusters!

I died. This post is being made by a dead person.

SHUT. UP.

(Source: sid-jenkins, via soniasaraiya)

Machines and humans work better with their heads together than apart. Jobs where workers and computers collaborate yield more effective results than when either goes it alone. One example, cited in “The Second Machine Age,” comes from chess: In 1997, the IBM computer Deep Blue toppled Garry Kasparov, sending ripples of existential despair through the chess world. Chess was over; machines had taken it. And yet in 2005, a supercomputer named Hydra with operating capabilities similar to Deep Blue was defeated by a pair of amateur players running multiple chess engines on three laptops. As Kasparov himself wrote in The New York Review of Books about that event: “Human strategic guidance combined with the tactical acuity of a computer was overwhelming.”

TUMBLR TAKE THE WHEEL

FOR A WEEK, I have been trying to find a freelance writer who meets the following specifications:

1) Writes good.

2) Lives in New York or is New York-accessible.

3) Has seen at least one season’s worth of THE WIRE.

4) Is free this upcoming Thursday evening.

5) Likes being paid to write about things.

HOW AM I HAVING A HARD TIME WITH THIS? ARE THERE TUMBLR PEOPLE WHO CAN SPREAD THE WORD, IN THIS, MY HOUR OF NEED?

Email Liz at indiewire dot com, if items 1-5 are within your grasp. (Proof of Item 1 appreciated, if we do not know each other already.) AND THANKS.

Remember when I posted a photo of the almost complete first draft of a novel? This is what it looks like, six weeks and two countries later. #robotboyfriend

Remember when I posted a photo of the almost complete first draft of a novel? This is what it looks like, six weeks and two countries later. #robotboyfriend

rowankaiser:

This happens occasionally on the Internet. Bill Scully, you are truly a dick.


Every time I see this actor in other things, I instictually get a little bit angry and defensive.

rowankaiser:

This happens occasionally on the Internet. Bill Scully, you are truly a dick.

Every time I see this actor in other things, I instictually get a little bit angry and defensive.

(via soniasaraiya)